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Dataset | 1 January 2013

Biogases

Data on consumption, production, transformation and supply of biogases for energy purposes. Data expressed in terajoules (TJ).

Consumption data are broken down by sector (e.g. agriculture, forestry and fishing, food and tobacco, households, etc.). Transformation data are broken down by type of plant (electricity, CHP, heat, etc.).

Biogases (BI), SIEC code 53: Gases arising from the anaerobic fermentation of biomass and the gasification of solid biomass (including biomass in wastes). Remark: The biogases from anaerobic fermentation are composed principally of methane and carbon dioxide and comprise landfill gas, sewage sludge gas and other biogases from anaerobic fermentation.

Biogases can also be produced from thermal processes (by gasification or pyrolysis) of biomass and are mixtures containing hydrogen and carbon monoxide (usually known as syngas) along with other components. These gases may be further processed to modify their composition and can be further processed to produce substitute natural gas.

These gases are produced either from anaerobic fermentation or from thermal processes.

For the purposes of this Questionnaire please report the total quantity of biogases produced, regardless of their production process. The data in TJ should be reported on a Net Calorific Value basis.

More details in http://unstats.un.org/unsd/energy/Energy-Questionnaire-Guidelines.pdf

The UNSD Annual Questionnaire on Energy Statistics (the “Questionnaire”) is the primary source of information for the UNSD Energy Statistics Database and contributes to the Energy Statistics Yearbook, the Energy Balances and the Electricity Profiles publications. The Energy Balances present energy data in a format showing an overall picture of energy production, trade, conversion and consumption for energy products utilized in the country, while Electricity Profiles contains detailed information on production, trade and consumption of electricity, net installed capacity and thermal power plant inputs and efficiencies.

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