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Access and generational gaps

While the world becomes increasingly hyperconnected, digital inequality (increased by the development of a digital oligarchy) is the fastest growing inequality, impacting all sectors of activities worldwide..

  • Some 4 billion people (most in rural, isolated communities) do not have internet access. | Related Megatrends: Technology; Work
  • Fighting educational inequalities and granting access to education to all, will decrease poverty and social exclusion significantly. The risk of poverty and social exclusion is three times higher for individuals with lower educational attainment.
  • While the world becomes increasingly hyperconnected, digital inequality (increased by the development of a digital oligarchy) is the fastest growing inequality, impacting all sectors of activities worldwide; (e.g. over 95% of all bitcoins in circulation are owned by about 4% of the market (1% of the addresses control 50% of the entire market)).
    | Related Megatrends: TechnologyEducationWork
  • Most of the jobs which are anticipated to expand until 2025 require at least a moderate level of digital skills combined with strong non-cognitive skills (e.g. communication and teamwork).
  • 44.5% of the EU population has insufficient skills to participate in the digital economy and society. 
  • This divide does not only exist between rich and poor but between different age groups as well; the Millennial generation, also known as Generation Y and Net Generation view technology as a functional necessity, not a modern convenience.
  • Digital competence developments are observed since very young age across Europe, mainly in family context and in an uneven and patchy way, depending mostly on the digital landscape available and on the digital knowledge in family. | Related Megatrends: Education; Work
  • The higher the level of human development, the greater the access to technology.

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